Posts Tagged ‘African Masks Designs’

African Masks For Kids

African Masks For Kids

African Masks For Kids

African Masks For Kids

Africa is the second largest continent in the world and has fifty-four countries. In the 19th century, European sailors discovered this continent. Today, African countries are among the most preferred travel destinations for adventure tourism. African countries are famous for their varied landscapes, flora and fauna, culture and traditions. African cuisine is steadily gaining popularity in other parts of the world. Each African country has a different kind of experience to offer. Take a look at the various African countries and their capitals.

List of African Countries and Capitals

Read the rest of this entry »

African Masks Meaning

African Masks Meaning

African Masks Meaning

African Masks Meaning

Of all African masks, those by the Dan people are the most distinguishable and highly sought after, with their minimal but expressively carved features, smooth modulations of facial planes and sleek polished black or dark brown surfaces. Collectors of African art adore the stark corpse-like faces of the Dan masks, which are normally crafted out of hard wood, cloth and cowry shell accents.

The Dan people have inhabited the regions of the Ivory Coast and Liberia since the eighth century B.C. Because they lacked a cohesive central government, identity as a Dan was fostered by a Read the rest of this entry »

African Masks Designs

African Masks Designs

African Masks Designs

African Masks Designs

The following is a general over view of African Masks.

There are still places in Africa where genuine old masks can be bought, generally through dealers. Also watch out for fakes as they do abound. Remember buy things you like as investment can go up as well as down. If you like that carving or mask then the value is not as important.

The African masks of this area are well documented by Ladislas Segy in Masks of Black Africa. Much of the following section on African Masks is influenced by his work. Read the rest of this entry »